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THE 'ANN WILSON'
THE 'ANN WILSON'



THE 'ANN WILSON'

         The Ann Wilson departed from Liverpool, England on the 30th November 1856 and arrived in Wellington, New Zealand on the 29th March 1857.


Above: The 1856 Wellington Independant Passenger list for 'The Ann Wilson' showing John, Rebecca,Sophia & W. Hooper as passengers. Also shown are the King family whose Passenger Contract Ticket is below.


          The Wellington Independant: The Ann Wilson arrived in Wellington Harbour on a Sunday afternoon, after a passage of exactly four months. In comparison with former vessels of this line her passage has been a long one, with that made by ships generally, it has been of an average lenght. We regret to say that out of about 220 souls, there has been eighteen deaths, four of whom are adults. One of these died soon after the vessel came to an anchor, and as it was reported to the Government that there had been a deficiency of medicines, medical stores, and water, and that the ventilation was defective, the Superintendant very properly directed the Coroner to hold an inquest on the body, and called on the Port Emigration Officer, to make an inspection of the general arrangements and condition of the vessel. The inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, on Monday evening, and adjourned to the Supreme Court House, this morning; pending results of the enquiry, it does not become us to state the opinion we have carefully formed; but we cannot help expressing our sense of the necessity of this investigation being of the most searching character, in justice not only to the Immigrants, but to the Captain, Surgeon, and all other parties concerned. Captain Sharp's report will no doubt be made public, and the complaints of the Immigrants brought under the notice of the Magistrate. Every thing that can be reasonably done to protect the people who have been induced to come to our shores, will, we are satisfied, be done by the Provincial Authorites, not only for their own character and the welfare of the Immigrants, but as a wholesome caution to ship owners for the future.


Above: George & Mary Ann King's  'Ann Wilson' 1856 passenger ticket

          The Baines and Company, Liverpool,"Black Ball" Line of British & Australian Royal Mail Packets. Passenger Contract Ticket. JB 6079 (pictured above) was issued to George King and his family. Sadly Edwin King was a boy aged 7 on the passenger list who died on this ill fated journey. I was sent a copy of this ticket by Paul Lawrence Bicknell who is doing research into the King family who sailed out to NZ on the Ann Wilson in 1856. He is related to me through his first cousin Valerie Cornwall who married my first cousin Mike Hooper. It is interesting to note that our Hooper family is also listed as passengers on the same vessel, The Ann Wilson, in 1856 and our Hooper family also lost a small child, Sophia Hooper, on the journey to New Zealand. One instance, of many, of the six degrees of seperation.

          Can anyone add to the list of lost souls below who died on the 'Ann Wilson' ? Email me:
jowarby@bigpond.net.au if you can help.



Above: Some of the deaths on board the 'Ann Wilson' may have been the result of small pox as it is reported above


DEATHS:
Sophia Hooper (Aged 6)
Edwin King (Aged 7)
Jonathon Deverell (Coroners Inquest held into his death in Wellington Harbour)
Thomas Seymour (Rest of family returned to UK)
William Field

THOSE WHO REPORTEDLY DIED DUE TO - BUT AFTER THE VOYAGE:
John Seymour (Died 1 month after arriving in NZ due to awful voyage)

BIRTHS:
Thomas Wilson Morris 23 March 1857 (Mother used 'Wilson' in his name)

PASSENGER LIST:
John Hooper
Rebecca Hooper (nee Page)
Sophia Hooper (Listed on the passenger list but it is presumed she died at sea)
William Hooper
.
          The outcome of the investiagtion found Captian Rutherford quilty of neglect with regards to the poor provisions. The court order him to pay fines but Captain Rutherford ansconded. It is believed he caught a whaling boat at Paliser Bay and boarded the 'Ann Wilson' for the return journey home and thus avoiding the payment of the fines.


    



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